Haestasaurus

Haestasaurus becklesii is a moderately sized macronarian from the Wealden of England. It was known as “Pelorosaurus” becklesii for a long time since its original description, with its humerus, the only overlapping material, significantly more robust than that of Pelorosaurus brevis. In the middle of summer this year, Paul Unchurch, Phil Mannion, and Mike Taylor published the first detailed redescription. Among the known material is the humerus, associated with a radius, and an ulna. But quite uniquely among all sauropods is the association of a skin impression with the elbow region of these remains. The scales are large and non-overlapping, but based on photographs I’ve seen they become smaller towards the edge of what is preserved.

Haestasaurus skeletonThe systematics of Haestasaurus have been under question for some time, and it was considered to be a primitive titanosaurian for some time. However, two of the three analyses found it to be a primitive macronarian, either a camarasaurid, or a non-camarasauromorph macronarian.

The skin impression of Haestasaurus, lies on a joint, a region where predators may attack to main an animal. That makes it seem like the more attacked regions would have had similar scales – the hindlimb, the underside, and the neck. Thus, In my life restoration based on the above skeletal which is also mine, I have added these pebbly and larger scales to these regions.

Haestasaurus reconstruction

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About ijreid

I am an amateur palaeontologist thats hobbies include studying extinct amniotes, specifically dinosaurs, birds, and mammals. Occasionally, I focus my time on detailed and accurate illustrations of dinosaurs, and I have completed drawings of Dysalotosaurus, Micropachycephalosaurus, Zhuchengtyrannus, Troodon, Eotyrannus, Europelta, and Achillobator. I do not believe in copyrights, and think that the world would be better if everything was open access.
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